Five things that your fingers can tell you.

Five things that your fingers can tell you.

Your five fingers relate to the Big Five of life: evolution, sports, behavior, diseases & your sex life:

John Manning is a professor at the University of Swansea and he wrote the book “The Finger Book”. Professor John Manning explains in his book how the ratio of the index finger and ring finger (= the ‘2D:4D digit ratio’ finger length) is related to the ‘Big five’ of life.

FINGERS & EVOLUTION

The human thumb is known as a ‘marker’ for the evolution of human kind; however our relative long index finger – compared to the ring finger – is a likewise example. In the chimpanzee and gorilla, this hand feature is different: they always have longer ring fingers and a short index finger.

THE RING FINGER & SPORTS

Exceptional performances in sports are being linked to the amount of male hormones that people absorb before birth while they stay in the womb. The ‘digit ratio’ has frequently been used to predict performances in various sports leagues.

THE INDEX FINGER & SOCIAL BEHAVIOR

Interestingly, especially among children a short index finger may indicate a lack of empathic ability.

CROSS-CONTAMINATION

There is growing statistical evidence that our finger ratios are a reliable predictor of our receptiveness to diseases. However, in real life the findings have not yet shown to have a significant impact.

YOUR FINGERS & YOUR SEX-LIFE

Men with long ring fingers, consider themselves as attractive. Studies show that women in the general rule agree and confirm the judgements of these men. Surprisingly, a likewise result has been found in women.

The distribution of finger length ratios.

READ FURTHER ABOUT MANNING’S FINDINGS:
Five things that your 5 fingers can tell you!
News facts about your hand
More finger length & digit ratio news
Hand reading: the international network
How index finger vs. ring finger ratio relates to financial success of London stock traders

Your hands & your sex life

Your hands & your sex life

Cupid’s Science

Anthropologist Helen Fisher explains what online dating sites can learn from the biology of love and what the length of your ring finger says about your sex life.

Last year you may have seen ads for Chemistry.com, the ones about people who have been rejected by online matchmaking sites like eHarmony for being gay, depressed, or generally unmarriageable for murkier reasons. In one ad, a young man stares hopefully at heterosexual p o r n, only to conclude, “Nope, still gay.” At Chemistry, spokespeople like to crow, you can “come as you are” (as long as you come as someone who is over 18).

The company is an offshoot of Internet meet-market Match.com, which has been around since 1994. In 2004, Match approached anthropologist Helen Fisher about designing a site where, like at the successful but restricted eHarmony, members would not shop blindly for dates, but would be matched with each other based on personality profiles and compatibility.

Fisher, whose work on s e x, love and the brain had made her an authority on human mating, developed a theory that human beings fall into four categories – negotiators, directors, explorers and builders – and that your type helps determine who you fall for.

Passage in the interview:

RT: What is this thing about your fingers? It’s on the Chemistry questionnaire.

HF: It’s called ‘digit ratio’ (finger length ratio). In the womb – during pregnancy – the brain is washed over by estrogen and testosterone. If you have a lot more testosterone than estrogen in the womb, it is going to build a longer fourth finger than pointer finger. If you’ve got a lot more estrogen in the womb, the pointer finger will be longer.

RT: What does it say about your personality?

HF: If you have more testosterone in the womb and you have a longer fourth finger, you’re more likely to have musical ability, mathematical abilities, to be an engineer or architect or good at computer programming. You tend to have poorer social skills but be direct, decisive, ambitious, competitive.

FULL ARTICLE:
Cupid’s Science

Digit ratio and sexual preference.