Finger length measurements.

Are you tall, short, or got a small head?
Don’t forget to take a look at your fingers!

Recently Roger Dobson – author at MailOnline.co.uk presented an informative article with the title: ‘Tall, short – or got a small head? Here’s what your physique reveals about your health’. The article describes how various body dimensions – varying from body length to foot size – can indicate useful information about your risk of developing certain conditions, varying from cancer through to dementia & heart disease.
The continuation presents a quote from Roger Dobson’s article about the 2D:4D digit length ratio – the hand characterstic that has become very well-known in the past few years through the work and the 2 books of ‘the finger’ Professor John T. Manning

Roger Dobson wrote in his article about the hand:

“IF YOU HAVE LONG FINGERS

Autism and ADHD, mental illness/depression

A range of disorders has been linked to the length of fingers, and in particular the ratio between index and ring fingers. The ratio is thought to be a marker of what was happening hormonally in the womb when the foetus developed.

It’s thought a relatively long ring finger is a sign that the foetus was exposed to higher levels of the male hormone testosterone, while a relatively long index finger is a marker of the female hormone, oestrogen.

Conditions associated with a long ring finger compared to the index include autism and ADHD. Those associated with a longer index include depression.

Males, who are more likely to develop autism and ADHD, tend to have a longer ring finger relative to their index finger.

Exposure to certain hormones might increase or reduce the risk of certain conditions and traits.

‘It has been suggested that autism may arise as the result of exposure to high concentrations of prenatal testosterone,’ say researchers at Liverpool University.”

digit ratio

A short history of major the developments in the concept of ‘digit ratio’:

  • In 1888 antropologist and biologist Dr. Frank Baker noticed that the index finger is usually short than the ring finger:
  • More than a hundred years ago, a very entertaining paper concerning various customs and superstitions associated with the hand – titled: Anthropological Notes on the Human Hand (1888) – was presented to the Antropological Society of Washington by Frank Baker, Professor of Anatomy at the University of Georgetown. Following some fascinating tales, and a debunking of palmistry, he concluded by discussing the comparative lengths of the digits, and noted that the second (index) finger is usually shorter than the fourth (ring) finger.

  • In 1930 antropologist Ruggles George noticed a sex difference in the index finger and the ring finger:
  • Some years later R. George described in a paper – titled: Human Finger types (1930) – a sex difference in the distribution of finger length ratios in that males are more likely to show the 2 < 4 pattern (i.e. a longer ring finger relative to the index finger), while females are more likely to show the opposite pattern (2 > 4).

  • In 1952 antropologist V.R. Phelps discovered that finger length is stable throughout life:
  • Two decades later the sex difference findings reported by George (1930) were confirmed in the work of V.R. Phelps – titled: Relative index finger length as a sex-influenced trait in man (1952) – noting that such differences were observed in foetuses, and then appeared to be stable throughout life.

    Psychologist Glenn Wilson

    Psychologist Glenn Wilson

    * In 1983 Psychologist Glenn Wilson introduced the word ‘digit ratio’:

    Dr Glenn Wilson of King’s College, London published a study – titled: ‘Finger length as an index of assertiveness in women‘ – which introduced the 2D/4D ‘digit ratio’ as a marker of exposure to prenatal testosterone + examining the correlation between assertiveness in women and their digit ratio. This was the first study to examine the correlation between digit ratio and a psychological trait within members of the same sex.

    Psychologist John T. Manning

    Psychologist John T. Manning

    * In 1998 Psychologist John T. Manning presented a link between ‘digit ratio’ and testosterone + sperm counts:

    This link was described by Manning in a study – titled: ‘The ratio of 2nd to 4th digit length: a predictor of sperm numbers and concentrations of testosterone‘.

    'Digit ratio' - the book

    Digit Ratio - the book

    * In 2002 Psychologist John T. Manning presented the book ‘Digit ratio’:

    Psychologist John T. Manning presented his first book about the 2D:4D ratio – titled: ‘Digit ratio: A Pointer to Fertility, Behavior and Health‘.

    In this book Manning presents a first overview of the digit ratio research which has been presented uptill the year 2002.

    The finger book

    The finger book

    * In 2008 Psychologist John T. Manning presented the book ‘The finger book’:

    Psychologist John T. Manning presented his first book about the 2D:4D ratio – titled: ‘The finger book‘.

    Quote from New Scientist:

    “According to evolutionary psychologist John Manning, who has spent years researching the secrets they betray, your digits reveal all sorts of things, from your sexuality to whether you are socially disadvantaged or likely to suffer a heart attack. They even, as the legend goes, give away the size of a man’s penis.”