Earlier this month Peter Hill from Melton claimed that his finger length became a clue for the diagnosis of his prostate cancer – after he read a newspaper article which explained that a man whose index finger is shorter than his ring finger (resulting in a low 2D:4D digit ratio) has a higher risk of developing prostate cancer.

Mr. Hill had been concerned that he might have the disease for some time but it was the article, based on research carried out by the University of Warwick in 2010, which prompted him to push his doctor for a blood test.

Peter Hill said:

“I went to Latham House and told them about my concerns, they carried out a blood test to measure the amount of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in my blood, and it confirmed that I had an extremely dangerous and very high result of 96.”

Mr Hill was immediately referred to Glenfield Hospital and then later Leicester Royal Infirmary for further tests meanwhile his PSA level rose to a worrying 117.

Prostate cancer was confirmed and in October 2012 he started hormone treatment for a year and then spent eight weeks, from January 2013, receiving radiotherapy until his PSA level dropped down to below 1.

Peter Hill said:

“The cancer will never go away but they have it under control now and I am currently in remission. I’m just really glad that I pushed my doctor to get the test done and I want to raise awareness of the importance of getting tested to men of a similar age.”

Dr Julian Barwell, of the Clinical Genetics Department at Leicester Royal Infirmary, said: “Mr Hill has now been given as good a result as you can get, and it’s a fantastic success story that he took the initiative to get checked following research he had looked into himself.”

Source: Modern Hand Reading Forum

Last year British researchers reported new confirmative findings for a link between index finger length (relative to ring finger length) and the risk of developing prostate cancer. Men featured with a longer index finger than ring finger, appear to have a 33% higher chance for not developing prostate cancer.

Often such studies are qualified by non-experts as “nonsense” – initially because of the association with classical palmistry. Usually a main argument of concern is the seize of the studied sample: many ‘2D:4D digit ratio’ studies have been focused relatively small samples, and usually with the statistics were simly not strong enough to be applied to individuals. But those arguments can not be used to the describe the new British study!

The new British research involves a study where the hands of 1,524 prostate cancer patients were examined, which were compared with a control group of 3,044 men.

It can also be noted that Professor John Manning described in his second book ‘The Finger Book‘ with great details the suspected link between the ‘2D:4D digit ratio’ and prostate cancer – a complex theory about of role glutamine chains in the sensitivity of hormone receptors, which in their turn play a role in the activation of testosterone in the body:

…The various forms of the androgen receptor have important consequences for our health and behaviour. For example, African-American men have shorter glutamine chains (high sensitivity to testosterone) than white men. Short glutamine chains are associated with an increased susceptibility to prostate cancer, and this may in part explain why the incidence of prostate cancer is higher in African-Americans than in white Americans. …”

In short, there seems to exist a triangular relationship between: 1) the high percentage of prostate cancer in Americans with African ancestry, 2) the length of the glutamine chains, and 3) the length ratio between index finger and ring finger.

The importance of the new British study can be recognized in the fact the use of preventive screening for prostate cancer – which is anno 2010 usually done through the use of a blood test – is still an object of confusion. Simply because the benefits of the screening devices are still very unclear. Meanwhile it is a fact that prostate cancer is known as the No. 1 cause of death from cancer in men (see picture below).

Therfore finger length assessment can become a new tool in prostate cancer screeing!

The British researchers therefore are speculating about how to add a practical application of their finger length study to the traditional methods of prostate cancer prevention screening!

RELATED SOURCES:
More finger length studies
How to read your own palm!