Prenatal testosterone exposure, as indicated by relative finger length, may be a marker of increased verbal aggression in adults, new research suggests.

In 2 studies, investigators measured the ratio of length of the second digit/index finger to length of the fourth digit/ring finger (2D:4D) of more than 600 young adult volunteers.

Those who had smaller 2D:4D ratios, which correlates with prenatal exposure to testosterone, reported more verbal aggression behaviors than did the participants with higher ratios. In addition, the male participants showed smaller 2D:4D ratios and higher levels of verbal aggression than their female counterparts.

“These findings are very promising,” lead author Allison Shaw, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Communication at the University at Buffalo–State University of New York, told Medscape Medical News.

The investigators report that this is one of the first studies to use this method to examine prenatal testosterone exposure as a determinant of a communication trait.

Although verbal aggression may be beneficial in certain situations, such as when standing up for oneself if attacked, higher degrees of this behavior have been shown to be detrimental, they note.

“Understanding the causes of verbal aggression, both biological and social, will allow therapists to have a greater understanding of how to work with these individuals,” said Dr. Shaw.

“In terms of clinical practice, I think the take-home message is that there is a longer process that is involved with this. It’s not just a set of behaviors.”

The study is published in the October issue of the Journal of Communications.

Proxy for Sex Hormones

According to the researchers, the ratio of 2D:4D is an indicator of prenatal androgen exposure (PNAE).

“The endocrine literature indicates that the ratio of the length of 2D to 4D is smaller for men than for women and this difference is driven by PNAE,” they write.

“Most importantly, data indicate that 2D:4D is a proxy for sex hormones levels at the time of brain organization.”

Previous research has also shown a link between 2D:4D and mental rotation ability, courtship behaviors, dominance, athletics, memory, and physical aggression.

“I became very interested in understanding how prenatal hormones can affect adult behavior. And as a communications major, I was especially interested in looking at communication behaviors,” said Dr. Shaw.

She noted that a recent study suggested that 2D:4D could predict financial success over a lifetime, which then gave her the idea to apply this technique toward understanding communication behaviors “not just in a social context but also within a biological one as well.”

In the first study, 224 students from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (52% women; mean age, 20.2 years) had each hand photocopied. From these images, measurements were taken of each finger from its tip to where it meets the palm of the hand.

Questionnaires that included Infante and Wigley’s verbal aggression measure were then administered to all participants.

The second study included 405 students from a large Midwestern university (49.6% women; mean age, 20.4 years). Investigators measured each of the participants’ fingers in person and from images of their hands.

These students filled out the same verbal aggression measure used in the first study as well as the self-reported Infante and Rancer’s Argumentativeness scale and the HEXACO Personality Inventory.

Important Indicators

In the first study, the men’s 2D:4D ratio was significantly smaller than the women’s — but only on the right hand ( P = .005). The men also showed higher levels of verbal aggression than did the women ( P < .001).

In addition, there were statistically significant correlations between 2D:4D and verbal aggression for both hands in both the men and the women.

In the second study, the men had significantly smaller mean 2D:4D ratios than the women on both hands for both the in-person and the photocopied measures. These men were also statistically more verbally aggressive than the women, but they were less argumentative.

Finally, the higher the level of verbal aggression, the lower the 2D:4D ratio for both sexes for the live measure of the right hand and photocopies of both hands.

The ratio did not correlate with either argumentativeness or openness to other experiences.

“This second study showed that 2D:4D didn’t correlate with just any type of communication behavior. Instead, it was with a very specific behavior caused by prenatal testosterone exposure,” said Dr. Shaw.

“Future research would profit by attempting to explicate the mediating mechanisms that result in androgen exposure and differences in 2D:4D and psychological dispositions,” write the investigators.

Dr. Shaw noted that, even so, the difference between the second and fourth digits for everyone “is pretty small.”

“You can’t really look at your hand and know your ratio or know if you’re predisposed to be more verbally aggressive than someone else,” she said.

“Instead, this is a proxy. In human research, we don’t have the ability to measure things perfectly. So these indicators are very important.”

J Commun. 2012;62:778-793. Abstract – The Effect of Prenatal Sex Hormones on the Development of Verbal Aggression

Via: Medscape

Earlier reports about 2D:4D digit ratios and agressesion:

Aggression, testosterone and your finger length!

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Aggression is likely related to the male hormone testosterone.

Aggression is likely related to the male hormone testosterone.

John Manning wrote in his first book ‘Digit Ratio’:

“Aggression may be viewed as hostile behavior motivated by fear and frustration … There is considerable uncertainty whether testosterone has a causal role in aggression, and other hormones such as cortisol may be equally or more important. In view of this uncertainty it may be instructive to examine whether the 2D:4D ratio or the lenght of the 4th digit adjusted for height are correlated with any forms of aggression including assertiveness, measures of status, verbal aggression, and physical aggression.”

In his first book John Manning presented research which indicates that in both men and women a low digit ratio is frequently accompagnied with: “More aggressive and assertive behaviour”. Since then various studies have confirmed the relationships between aggressive behavior, high levels of testosterone, and a low digit ratio:

An overview of some of the more recent scientific sources which have found a link between finger length and aggressive behavior:

* The presence of aggression cues inverts the relation between digit ratio (2D:4D) and prosocial behaviour in a dictator game. – 2008

* On the relation between 2D:4D and sex-dimorphic personality traits. – 2008

* Finger length ratio (2D:4D) correlates with physical aggression in men but not in women. – 2005

* Digit length ratios predict reactive aggression in women, but not in men. – 2004

Finger length & athletic ability.

Athletic ability is indicated by your finger length.

Athletic ability is indicated by your finger length.

A finger length secret:

Look at the length of your index finger in relation to your ring finger. If your index finger is longer, you’re probably a ‘couch potato’. If your ring finger is longer, chances are you love to exercise.

Reuters Health reports that a number of previous human studies have linked finger length ratio to certain behaviors and personality traits, including aggression, athletic ability and even academic skills.

Making a sweeping generalization, men tend to have a shorter index finger in relation to their ring finger, while the two fingers tend to be the same length in women. The so-called “male pattern”–whether it’s seen in men or women–often means there is more aggression and greater athletic ability, while the “female pattern” is associated with stronger verbal skills.

Now researchers at the University of Alberta in Edmonton in Canada have investigated the relationship in 1,000 white mice. When they selectively bred mice to enhance the trait of increased physical activity, those mice had a higher digit ratio. And although this behavior was clearly associated with digit ratio, the findings were the opposite of those observed in humans, reports Reuters. Specifically, the mice with a lower (or “male pattern”) digit ratio tended to be lazier than the mice with the “female pattern,” who took to their running wheels far more frequently.

If you’re lazy, can you blame it on the length of your fingers? Not a chance. Study co-author and associate professor of psychology Dr. Peter L. Hurd told Reuters Health, “The effect sizes for digit ratios on behavior in humans are really small, making it virtually impossible to tell anything about a single individual from their hands,” Hurd told Reuters Health. “The pattern only emerges when a great many people are examined.” He says comparing finger length to behavior is interesting because it says something about personality traits that are fixed during early development in the womb.

READ FURTHER ABOUT FINGER LENGTH- & DIGIT RATIO:
A finger length secret
The finger book
Digit Ratio
The latest finger length news

Finger length & athletic ability.